Currently there is no industry wide accepted standards defined for sharpness of surgical blades  and needles.US government used Federal Specification (#GG-H-0800) from the 1960’s, to outline standard and quality requirements for surgical Scalpels  and surgical blades .Federal Specification (#GG-H-0800) was very original, attempting to merely identify gross defects. Some of the key standards defined for surgical blades  and surgical Scalpels  per this specification were: There shall be no blades  which will contain a nick greater than .004” – “Nick” was defined as a chipped-out, broken-out, indented, or bent out piece of metal, a semicircular projection or any similar gap, indentation, or projection. There were further details in the specification to outline the allowable limits of numbers and sizes of smaller nicks. There shall be no blades  which contains a feather greater than .005” in length - Feathers were defined as a thin, curled, or turned edge, not removed by honing or buffing. There were further details in the specification to outline the allowable limits of smaller feathers. There shall be no blades  which has no burs, jags, or other defects on the cutting edge. “Bur” was identified as a piece of metal projection not inherent to a smooth uniform surface. A “jag” was identified as several small toothlike projections or similar indentations, individually smaller than a nick, and collectively greater than .015” in length per the specification details. blades  inspection was to be done at 10x magnification on a binocular microscope with two 15watt lamps